The Recursive Muffin

Oct 12
I’ve seen the map above attributed the USS Dolphin survey in 1836, and also dated 1853, and referred to as both “hypsometry” and “bathymetry” (it’s the latter).  In all events, I am interested in it because it’s the earliest map I’m aware of using concentric topographic lines (or shading bands, in this case).  Anyone know of an earlier example?
My larger question is whether this technique for recording elevation came directly out of Euler diagrams, or if it’s co-evolution.

I’ve seen the map above attributed the USS Dolphin survey in 1836, and also dated 1853, and referred to as both “hypsometry” and “bathymetry” (it’s the latter).  In all events, I am interested in it because it’s the earliest map I’m aware of using concentric topographic lines (or shading bands, in this case).  Anyone know of an earlier example?

My larger question is whether this technique for recording elevation came directly out of Euler diagrams, or if it’s co-evolution.


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